Holidays to KRAKOW

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about Krakow

Krakow is a second largest Poland city, which is located on the Vistula River in Lesser Poland. It is one of the most famous, beautiful and oldest cities of the Poland. Krakow is a tourist destination, which attracts millions of visitors from all across the globe every year.

This magical city is worldwide famous for its various tourist places, nightlife, clubs, food joints, economical accommodation and many more. If you want to taste the lifestyle, cultural and history in Poland, just plan your trip out of the centre of the city and visit nearby areas too.

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KRAKOW INFORMATION

Currency

Currency

Euro €

Language

Language

Greek

Time Zone

Time Zone

GMT+03:00

Avg. flight Time

Avg. flight Time

3h 30m

Peak Travel

Peak Travel

June-September

Price of pint

Price of pint

£2.50

bar-chart

Map of KRAKOW

map

More about KRAKOW

Stare Miasto (Old Town)

 

Krakow, Street, Poland, Tourism, Old

 

Kraków’s oldest quarter is a planned city drawn up in 1257 just after the Mongol invasion laid everything to waste.

 

The whole city was encircled by walls, now a belt of parkland, and hoisted above its southernmost point was the mighty royal ensemble on Wawel Hill.

 

A day in the Old Town will fly by as you drift from churches to atmospheric squares, tempting specialty shops to museums.

 

The simple act of going for meal or a drink can be a historical journey, descending into cellars with Gothic vaults.

 

A couple of things we won’t talk about later are the tower of the former town hall, now an observation platform on the Main Square.

 

But also pop into a bakery for a ring-shaped obwarzanek krakowski, a slightly sweet bun not too different from a bagel.

Food

 

Raspberry, Berry, Summer, Closeup

 

There’s no denying that the Poles love their pierogi (dumplings). Found in cheap and cheerful cafeterias, upmarket restaurants and hospitable households throughout the country, these doughy delights are an essential part of any visit to Poland. Perhaps somewhat stodgy for non-natives, pierogi are one of the mainstays of traditional Polish cuisine. Baked, boiled or fried and usually served smothered with lard, sour cream, butter or onions, pierogi come in a variety of sweet and savoury fillings.

 

Pierogi ruskie (cottage cheese, potato and onion), pierogi z kapusta i grzybami (with cabbage and mushrooms) and pierogi z miesem (with meat) form the holy trinity but those with a sweet tooth will be happy to know that sweet cheese and fruit varieties are also popular. Seen by some as a drab reminder of Poland’s somewhat austere past, pierogi are currently enjoying something of a revival. The classics still prevail, but they can often now be found alongside more contemporary takes on this quintessential Polish dish such as venison with bacon or chicken with Mexican chili beans. Sharpen your forks and forewarn your stomaches as we take in the best five ‘pierogarnias’ in Krakow.

 

One of the most recognizable food in Polish cuisine is their national dish - pierogi or piero?ki (diminutive). They can be filled with anything, from sweet sauces and fruit to boiled potatoes, cottage cheese. The most popular filling, however, is meat with sauerkraut and mushrooms. Pierogi is Polish food always served during Christmas.

Kosciuszko Mound

 

Kosciuszko'S Mound, Hill, Monument, Wall

 

Tadeusz Ko?ciuszko was a Polish national hero, lauded for his resistance efforts against Prussia and Russia as they divided up the former Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth at the end of the 18th century.

 

In 1794 he led a doomed but spirited insurrection against Russia, begun on Kraków’s Main Square.

 

After Ko?ciuszko died his body was interred beneath this 34-metre-high mound, in the style of rulers from Poland’s distant past.

 

The mound was completed in 1823 and is at the top of the Sikornik hill 326 metres above sea level.

 

At the base of the mound are the walls of a military citadel erected by Austrians in the mid-19th century.

 

In the defences is the Neo-Gothic Blessed Bronis?awa chapel, offering entry to the mound, which you can climb on a winding path to look west to Kraków’s Old Town.

Nightlife

 

Disney, Person, Human, Female

 

If you believe urban legend (like we do) Kraków has the highest density of bars in the world. Simply hundreds of bars can be found in cellars and courtyards stretching from the Old Town to Kazimierz and beyond. Keeping them open, of course, are the thousands of tourists that flock to Kraków every year, and with higher tourism comes higher prices: expect to pay about 10z? (2.35 Euros) for a large lager these days, and up to 15zl (3.5 Euros) for a craft beer. The opening hours we list are flexible; basically if people are drinking, the barman is pouring.

 

For clubbing, the main hedonist high streets are Floria?ska and Szewska, where nary a medieval cellar will be left unthronged by sexed-up students on a Friday or Saturday night; you can also expect most clubs to charge a cover of anywhere from 5-20z? those nights. While the opening hours we list here are confirmed by the venues themselves, most are rather flexible; basically if people are drinking, the barman is pouring.

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